The Power of 26- The Power of Planning

Greetings once again and thank you for joining me. Last week was my Return To Form, my first contribution in sometime. I hope you enjoyed it.

A successful end result in any endeavour can usually be traced back to good planning.

What do we want to do? What can we afford? What tools or talent pool do we already have? What do we need to bring in? How long will it take? Are we able to manage this?

That’s not to say your success won’t be without challenges and things to overcome.
But taking the time to plan, research, evaluate your resources, test and keep trying will eliminate a lot of pitfalls and keep you from going down too many dead ends and blind alleys.

Earlier I advised I have completed a series of videos and articles related to my work. Today we’re going to step into article number two in our series of 10, for the
Top 10 Mistakes In Advertising and How to Avoid Them.

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Article #2 – Plan Your Campaign Timing Carefully

As we saw in article number one, Testing remains front and centre The most important and powerful and effective thing you can do to help your advertising. Regardless of the budget, the message, the media placement you make.

You need to test and test and keep testing because there is going to be an opportunity for improvement, however modest, in each and every ad. And those cumulative changes can be absolute gold showing you what your customers want and need, and are prepared to put their hand up for it.

Now, you have testing ingrained and under your skin and it’s going to be
part and parcel of every ad moving forward, correct ? Good. I’m thrilled to learn that you’re onboard with that.

Mistake Number Two that I’ve seen too often through the years is that far too many advertisers are jumping in at any time without rhyme and reason wondering if this is the
best seasonality to be in front of the target. Certainly I understand very few advertisers can afford to be there all the time, running their campaign at full throttle, and that’s not unexpected.

You have to have some rather deep pockets to keep an ongoing campaign all of the
time. You can quickly make yourself broke if you keep marketing, but not testing to see if the ads are working.

The whole idea is salesmanship. And that goes back to John E. Kennedy in 1904.
Hi mantra was that your advertising is ‘Salesmanship in Print’ and so what you want to do is make sure that every single ad you have out there gives you the opportunity to make a sale. That’s kinda why you’re marketing isn’t it?

Regardless of what you’re selling, product or service, you want to sell something.
So make sure every ad is a sales opportunity for you.

Maybe this is your baptism in to Planning. Welcome. Here we go:
Here’s what I’d like you to do. Maybe some of you are already doing this and if so that’s fantastic because it will give you a much better understanding of your spending and your planning.
The biggest challenge for many advertisers is not anticipating when their best sales periods are going to be and so they’re jumping at every opportunity for every well-intended media sales person, who comes through the

In the majority they are all very good people and I have some wonderful relationships with many of my sales reps going back decades, which is fantastic. They have become true allies for me in making a campaign that works incredibly hard for my clients.
I applaud them and I continue to do business with them.

But understand their mandate is to sell. To sell the advertising space or time or placement. And they want to see you do well but they also want to see some money.
It is in their interest to get you to advertise as often as possible with their
publication, their website, their outdoor board, their radio station, and kudos to them, they should be. That can really stretch a budget if you’re trying to be there all the time and you’re not sure what you should be doing. So here’s a simple thing that will really help crystallize for you what your timings should be like.

Planning: I want you to map out an entire year on a spreadsheet. It can be any fiscal if
you prefer but for simplistic sake I try to stick to a calendar, January to December.

I want you to pick any two sales periods. If you have more, that’s great but two is easier
to work with. The times where you have some sales history showing you your best months, your products’ seasonal applicability will determine the key sales potential period.

So let’s say April and May for spring and then November and December for winter are your best sales carrots. What I want you to do is devote up to 50% of your annual ad budget to support these two windows.

That’s where perhaps upwards of 80% of your business is coming from so you should
be giving those two key periods the best opportunity to maximize your exposure. Put most of your marketing muscle in there because they are driving the majority of your revenue. Now these are the key times that you want to be making sure your name is out there on an ongoing basis. They will get your most attention and your most support.
The remaining eight months of the year will share the remaining 50% of the budget and perhaps you devote 30% to six months and 20% to the remaining two months.

You can do that up as you feel comfortable, and your cash flow allows. But what this does and it’s been my experience, that it gives you sustained presence to have some modest exposure so you’re always on your prospects radar.

You don’t have to be running full-throttle all the time but it allows you to
ramp up your presence in the four heaviest months split between spring and winter.

Then you have maybe six months that are second tier and that need some increased support. But they’re not the same demand period so you don’t have to be with your foot on the pedal quite as aggressively through those periods.

The intensity is not as critical, as your key periods. Then the lightest months for some advertisers that’s, you know, the summer period, June July maybe August when people are at last vacationing or not really in an aggressive mode of work because the outdoor beckons, those might be your lighter periods.
Please keep some spending out there. You don’t want to lose all of the equity and all of the awareness that you’ve built up through your spring periods.

So you want to have some ongoing presence, however modest, just to make sure that your key audience knows that you’re still in there pitching. Your lightest months can just be a sustaining presence. Thus the times where you have some sales history showing you your best months, your products’ seasonal applicability will determine the key sales potential period.

This is only one of many deployment strategies, as I’ve discovered. I’ve had the great good fortune of working with both large and small agencies and some advertisers who had very modest budgets while others have very deep pockets.

You don’t have to spend more than the competition. Certainly it helps, it helps to increase your media exposure when you have multiple opportunities there, but you just have to spend smarter, at the right times.

Planning means you take the time to map out on a calendar what your key sales periods are to maximize your sales messaging.  The value of ad planning cannot be overstated.

Heads-Up:  this is probably the single biggest tip I can give you.
Importantly, Plan Early. Planning months in advance you will save yourself an enormous amount of grief but more importantly you will save an enormous amount of money. So take the time to plan out your scheduling and spend smarter.

It’s been my privilege to have you along today. Thank you I look forward to you joining me in Article #3

You can view Video # Two at these links:

Top Ten Mistakes In Advertising & How To Avoid Them

(https://www.firstimpressionsmedia.ca/top-10-mistakes—videos-by-dennis.html)

OR

Top Ten Mistakes In Advertising and How To Avoid Them – Video # 2 of 10
https://youtu.be/-V2oRDTnf4Q

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Dennis Kelly
President
First Impressions Media
www.firstimpressionsmedia.ca

Ph & Fax: 905-427-3819
E-mail: dennis@firstimpressionsmedia.ca

 

 

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The Power of 26 – On The Tip of My Tongue

In a recent post, I shared the disheartening experience of finishing
3rd in a 3 person contest, but philosophically expressed the importance
of being prepared.

It’s one thing to be bested by someone else in any contest or event.

It’s another when you are defeated because you didn’t try or offer up your best.
Dad taught me hundreds of lessons, but among the most memorable was
after a baseball game, when there were too many losses in a season, he asked if
I had played my best. When I said yes, he said ‘That’s ALL you can ask for.’

Being prepared and playing or participating to the best of your talents is all
you can offer. Finishing less than first is no shame if you’ve given it everything
you’ve got.

But the importance of being prepared was not lost on me because only a few
days later I was called upon to be a substitute in the next contest.
It was to be 90 seconds to 2 minutes of unrehearsed presentation.
A demonstration of how well you can think on your feet and
come up with an engaging story without benefit of writing it out
ahead of time.

And this my dear readers is where preparedness takes over. It was a topic
right in my wheelhouse and the gods were smiling on my silver tongue as
I was able to weave 26 letters together for the First Place Speech.

This time I was first of 3 speakers. While it was unrehearsed, I was no less
prepared by having done similar situations perhaps several hundred times now.
The words flowed readily because of the comfort of having done it before.

Everyday is a rehearsal for your next success. Sometimes it seems invisible.
Beyond reach. Out of your grasp.  And all the while the right moment is simmering,
waiting for the chance when your talent and opportunity come together to become
your stage to shine.

Don’t ever stop practicing. Rehearsing. Preparing. Reading. Learning.
Training. It has been expressed by many successful people in all fields of
endeavour that they are ‘lucky’.  Nearly everyone of them will attest that the
harder they work, the more luck they have.

Your successes are not ‘once and done’. Rather they should be an ongoing
stream of opportunities tried. Some resounding successes where you are showered with
accolades and or riches. Other efforts it may feel like ‘she got the gold mine,
and you got the shaft’, but these are only occasional hiccups
to spur you to greater successes.

Don’t ever let one success or failure be your defining moment.
Your growing power to wield those 26 letters with authority and confidence
will move the world to behave exactly as you wish it to be.

That’s The Power of 26.

Dennis Kelly
dennis@firstimpressionsmedia.ca
http://www.firstimpressionsmedia.ca